redcloud
spaceplasma:

The Orion Nebula Seen in Infrared and Visible Light

VISTA — the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy is the largest survey telescope in the world and is dedicated to mapping the sky at infrared wavelengths. The large (4.1-metre) mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors make VISTA a unique instrument. This dramatic new image of the Orion Nebula illustrates VISTA’s remarkable powers.
The Orion Nebula is a vast stellar nursery lying about 1350 light-years from Earth. Although the nebula is spectacular when seen through an ordinary telescope, what can be seen using visible light is only a small part of a cloud of gas in which stars are forming. Most of the action is deeply embedded in dust clouds and to see what is really happening astronomers need to use telescopes with detectors sensitive to the longer wavelength radiation that can penetrate the dust. VISTA has imaged the Orion Nebula at wavelengths about twice as long as can be detected by the human eye.

Credit: ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA & R. Gendler

spaceplasma:

The Orion Nebula Seen in Infrared and Visible Light

VISTA — the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy is the largest survey telescope in the world and is dedicated to mapping the sky at infrared wavelengths. The large (4.1-metre) mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors make VISTA a unique instrument. This dramatic new image of the Orion Nebula illustrates VISTA’s remarkable powers.

The Orion Nebula is a vast stellar nursery lying about 1350 light-years from Earth. Although the nebula is spectacular when seen through an ordinary telescope, what can be seen using visible light is only a small part of a cloud of gas in which stars are forming. Most of the action is deeply embedded in dust clouds and to see what is really happening astronomers need to use telescopes with detectors sensitive to the longer wavelength radiation that can penetrate the dust. VISTA has imaged the Orion Nebula at wavelengths about twice as long as can be detected by the human eye.

Credit: ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA & R. Gendler

Bizarro Day

Slept in weird shifts last night. I’ve got this brace that immobilizes my ankle in this 90 degree angle. Hurts like a mother but whatever it’s supposed to help.

I got up this morning and it wasn’t on. I apparently ripped it off and threw it last night. It was by the window this morning.

I took a call from work then did email. Lost track of time and started a second call.

I pointed my phone at my car and pressed my thumb to it and wondered why the doors were not opening.

I need coffee and breakfast but too late for breakfast and no time to stop for coffee.

Wearing suspenders for the first time and it’s like some tiny person is following me and hiking my pants up.

My kingdom for a nap.

Need to fix this coffee situation though, surely I can delay my meeting for 10 minutes and everyone will not in unison and say things like “yes, coffee, it’s a must. Didn’t mind the wait at all”. Surely.

helms-deep

helms-deep:

mindofachef:

Check out this preview of the upcoming episode of  Mind of a Chef - Bourbon.

A drink barely understood, chef Edward Lee finds out what actually makes a great bourbon. With the help of Paul Qui, Aisha Tyler and others, Edward attempts to uncover the history and unearth the complexities of the whiskey.

Paging morebaffledlessbrooklyn, evangotlib, section9, and many others I’d love to share a bourbon with while out east in a few weeks.

Feel free to come have all of the bourbon with me! 

Couple more weeks until the new Lestat book.

I’ve had that thing pre-ordered as soon as I found out about it.  I cannot tell you how excited (or how nervous) I am about this book. 

I am seriously going to take a weekend and just read the entire thing to I know to be happy or sad about it and not draw it out like I did with “The Witching Hour”. (Seriously, took me years to read that book - then I kick myself for not just trudging along because it was really well done)

This wasn’t my pumpkin but I did get an explosion on video.

The phrase at the end is because I was hit with pumpkin and water.

Today we went shooting. Annual jack-o-lantern carving trip.

Each pumpkin you see was shot from anywhere between 10 feet (smiling one) to my big mouth one that was shot from 150 feet.

We then packed the remains (the “helmeted” pumpkins) with Tannerite and blew pumpkin chunks for about a 300 foot radius.

Someone has a video of me exploding my pumpkin and I’ll post it when I get it.

The brass in the chair is mostly mine; I’m a firm believer in brass policing so I made it easy. Just ejected into a chair - no bending!